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What to start with when learning how to sew?

February 13th, 2013 Leave a comment Go to comments

Hello,
I decided I would really like to learn how to sew but right now i have no idea how to. I was just wondering how you started (sewing clothes for dolls, reading books,etc) and any advice on how I should as well.
Thanks!

Although it’s certainly possible to learn to sew all on your own, just from books and experimentation, it’s easier for almost everyone if you take a few classes along the way — either informally from family and friends, or formally from teachers.

Assuming it’s machine sewing you’re interested in, I usually start beginners with projects like pillowcases or drawstring bags, tote bags, tool or jewelry rolls, pj pants or nightgowns. My own first hand sewing experiences were in embroidery, then hemming dishtowels; my first machine sewing was cafe curtains, when I was not quite 6.

Your first challenges will include skills like cutting accurately (easier said than done!), learning to control the sewing machine, stitching straight and curved seams accurately, pressing seams correctly and learning to select fabric and pattern that can work together.

If you’re thinking about buying a sewing machine, and you happen to have classes available that will let you use someone else’s sewing machines, I’d suggest you go that route for first experience; then you can better judge machines when you go looking. http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20100120140429AApYwiY

Where to find lessons: 4H, if you’re young enough; fabric stores and sewing machine dealers; adult ed and community college classes, private lessons. If you’re in the US and stuck, try contacting the local chapter of ASG, American Sewing Guild (http://www.asg.org) to see if someone can suggest a teacher. Good books to start with include Simplicity’s Simply The Best Sewing Book (which has a home-dec leaning), Connie Crawford’s Guide to Fashion Sewing (strictly garments), and the good ol’ Readers Digest Complete Guide to Sewing. There are also videos and DVDs available; one I particularly like for a beginner is Crawford’s Studio Sewing Skills, which starts with learning to thread a sewing machine and progresses through basic clothing construction, step by step. Check with your local library and grab some books or videos and start playing with some fabric!

  1. pattiann42
    February 13th, 2013 at 12:20 | #1

    Look for classes or ask at fabric/sewing shops.

    Search http://www.switchboard.com for what is available in your area.
    References :

  2. Miba
    February 13th, 2013 at 13:06 | #2

    I taught myself. I went down to Wal-Mart and got the cheapest brand sewing machine and then read the manual. It took time, trial and error. Go buy a sewing book from the bookstore. Make sure you look through it to see if it has what you need to know, and that it’s written in a way you can understand. There are several different types of sewing books out there, so take your time and pick a good one. My first sewing book was the Singer’s Photo Guide, because I learn better from pictures than from text.

    As for projects, just whatever you want. Pick something with straight lines, nothing fancy. Like a simple skirt or a shirt maybe. Browse the patterns and see if any of the Easy or In an Hour type patterns look simple enough. My first project was an apron.

    Pick simple fabrics that don’t slip and slide on each other. Maybe get some cheap cotton to practice on, from the Wal-Mart’s dollar bin. Stay away from knits for a while.

    Good luck and welcome to sewing!!! ­čÖé
    References :

  3. kay
    February 13th, 2013 at 13:43 | #3

    Although it’s certainly possible to learn to sew all on your own, just from books and experimentation, it’s easier for almost everyone if you take a few classes along the way — either informally from family and friends, or formally from teachers.

    Assuming it’s machine sewing you’re interested in, I usually start beginners with projects like pillowcases or drawstring bags, tote bags, tool or jewelry rolls, pj pants or nightgowns. My own first hand sewing experiences were in embroidery, then hemming dishtowels; my first machine sewing was cafe curtains, when I was not quite 6.

    Your first challenges will include skills like cutting accurately (easier said than done!), learning to control the sewing machine, stitching straight and curved seams accurately, pressing seams correctly and learning to select fabric and pattern that can work together.

    If you’re thinking about buying a sewing machine, and you happen to have classes available that will let you use someone else’s sewing machines, I’d suggest you go that route for first experience; then you can better judge machines when you go looking. http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20100120140429AApYwiY

    Where to find lessons: 4H, if you’re young enough; fabric stores and sewing machine dealers; adult ed and community college classes, private lessons. If you’re in the US and stuck, try contacting the local chapter of ASG, American Sewing Guild (http://www.asg.org) to see if someone can suggest a teacher. Good books to start with include Simplicity’s Simply The Best Sewing Book (which has a home-dec leaning), Connie Crawford’s Guide to Fashion Sewing (strictly garments), and the good ol’ Readers Digest Complete Guide to Sewing. There are also videos and DVDs available; one I particularly like for a beginner is Crawford’s Studio Sewing Skills, which starts with learning to thread a sewing machine and progresses through basic clothing construction, step by step. Check with your local library and grab some books or videos and start playing with some fabric!
    References :
    50 years of sewing

  4. sew cool
    February 13th, 2013 at 14:30 | #4

    Many years ago my aunt taught me how to sew. We made patterns out of newspaper. Later in high schooll I took a tailoring class. To date I have taught three girls how to sew. One went on to fashion design school in New York. May I suggest you take some classes or ask someone who loves to sew to teach you. Be patient and be prepared to rip out seams and start over. At the begining pick simple patterns. The patterns say, "sew in a day" or "quick and easy". Get a good pair of sissors, some pins, a measuring tape, good quality cheap fabric that you love and a seam ripper that is comfortable in your hand. I am assuming you have a sewing machine.
    Good Luck and have fun!
    References :

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