Garments

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I am just starting out, although I took a class years ago, I was not very good – especially in adjusting tension and all those little things. I am getting a sewing machine now that I am retired – what would be the best? I'm thinking of a Brother XR 7700

What features do you want? Are you on a budget? Most machines will sew just fine with the upper tension set on 4 and left there. IMHO, it's easier to teach you what a balanced stitch
looks like than try to fight through the screens of some programs to adjust something that the computer is doing "wrong".

My personal experience with Brother machines has not been good, but ymmv. I'd strongly urge you to consider trying out a number of machines at local sewing machine dealers if at all possible, and finding the machine(s) that will work for you.

My minimal criteria (I do a lot of garment making, some quilting, no machine embroidery other than freemotion): Very good straight stitch, at least a pretty good zigzag, non-jamming bobbin case, buttonhole that doesn't drive you nuts, adjustable presser foot presser, at least a fair range of presser feet made for the machine. For my own use, I also want stretch and regular blindhem, a couple of stitches I can use for fagoting, a couple of hemstitches, and some stitches that are good for faking blanket stitches for applique. My primary machine is a 10 year old Viking electronic, middle of the line.

Because I sew so many garments, I also have a serger and a coverstitch machine — personally, I'd sooner have a good serger and a so-so sewing machine than a fancy sewing machine, but again, that's personal preference.

Some help:
http://www.cet.com/~pennys/faq/smfaq.htm
http://www.taunton.com/threads/pages/tvt046.asp
http://www.taunton.com/threads/pages/t00130.asp
I also urge you to read the first and last chapters of Carol Ahles' book Fine Machine Sewing (available from most libraries).

Filed under Embroidery Library by on . 2 Comments#

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In the price range of $300 or less, what is the best sewing machine to buy? Brand name and model specific please. It would be used to create designed stitches, and would like to make button holes but not a must have.

"create designed stitches" is not a phrase I really understand…. are you trying to say that it needs to do embroidery? Or are you saying you need programmable stitch functions? Or are you telling me it will be used for a variety of garments? If you can clarify for me, I'd be happy to try further. Otherwise, here's my advice for first sewing machines:

http://www.cet.com/~pennys/faq/smfaq.htm

What I want for beginners in sewing:

– a machine that doesn't scare you
– a machine that isn't balky (cheap new machines are often very
balky or need adjustments often and are rarely repairable —
just too frustrating to learn on!)
– very good straight stitch
– good zigzag (4-5 mm is fine, more than that is gravy)
– a method of making buttonholes that makes sense to you
– adjustable presser foot pressure (which helps some fabric
handling issues)
– accessory presser feet that don't cost an arm and a leg
(machines that use a "short shank foot" typically handle
generic presser feet pretty well. Some brands of machines use
proprietary or very expensive presser feet)

If the budget stretches far enough:

– blindhem and stretch blindhem stitches
– triple zigzag (nice for elastic applications)
– a couple of decorative stitches (you won't use them nearly as
much as you think)
– electronic machine because of the needle position control and
because the stepper motors give you full "punching force" at
slow sewing speeds — mechanical machines often will stall at
slow speeds.

Please go to the best sewing machine dealers around and ask them
to show you some machines in your price range, *especially* used
machines you can afford. You'll get a far better machine buying
used than new, and a good dealer is worth their weight in sewing
machine needles when you get a machine problem — often they can
talk you through the problem over the phone. While you're trying
things out, try a couple of machines (sewing only, not combo
sewing-embroidery) over your price limit, just so you can see
what the difference in stitch quality and ease of use might be.
You may find you want to go for the used Cadillac. Or you might
want the new basic Chevy. Might as well try both out.

Suggested reading: John Giordano's The Sewing Machine Book
(especially for used machines), Carol Ahles' Fine Machine Sewing
(especially the first and last few chapters) and Gale Grigg
Hazen's Owner's Guide to Sewing Machines, Sergers and Knitting
Machines. All of these are likely to be available at your public
library.

Used brands I'd particularly look for: Elna, Bernina,
Viking/Husqvarna, Pfaff, Singer (pre 1970), Juki, Toyota

New "bargain brand" I'd probably pick: Janome (who also does
Kenmore).

Filed under Embroidery Library by on . 2 Comments#

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I’m a student and i work primarily on a tabletop juki machine. They are very fast and i can get allot done in very little time. But I’m going to be moving soon and i will need a machine that can complete all different types of garments at a relatively fast pace.
Can I complete the same in of work at the same pace with a home sewing machine?

Thanks for the help.

Yes, and no. There are a few models of home machines that are designed for pros and do work at a faster speed than others. Janome produces a professional model, the MC6600P machine that sews 1200 stitches a minute straight stitch. The el-cheapo machine at wal mart or Target…not so fast. Or as reliable. if you are used to the speed and the stitch quality offered by a fast machine then the majority of the home machines will be far too slow and you'll be waiting for the machine to catch up to you.

Since you do so much sewing the professional model is a much better investment. It looks like a home machine on the outside, but inside it has the speed and stitch quality that a professional advanced sewer needs. It will complete a wide variety of garments quickly and efficiently. It has lots of utility stitches and a good variety of decorative stitches too. It doesn't do pre-programmed hooped embroidery -which is a good thing! You can do free motion embroidery easily. It is a table top home machine with the motor and head in one unit.

If you wish to buy an industrial machine that does a variety of stitches then the Bernina 950 is a good machine. It is a true industrial meaning the table, motor and head are separate. It offers 14 stitches and a semi automatic buttonhole.

Here are the two machines:
http://www.berninausa.com/product_detail-n2-i223-sUS.html and in it's price for purchase with table, motor, and head: http://www.allbrands.com/products/abp00796-0070.html
The Janome worthy of your talents: http://www.janome.com/index.cfm/Machines/Sewing-Quilting/MC6600P

I have several industrials and I find many home machines far too slow. I run home machines at a "pedal to the metal" speed and I find the Janome is the closest to industrial speed. Most domestic home machines, even the expensive brands, don't have the same level of speed that a pro is accustomed to. Hope that helped a bit.

3

The embroidery machine is brother 190-d using a memory card, but as i can download free patterns or use my own want to know how.

By reading another persons answer to a different question I have just found a great site for you to look at. It has a list of sections on machine embroidery, and has a section on exactly what you want. Its called digitising step by step. There are also many things that it will clarify for you which you can do with your machine.

http://www.taunton.com/threads/pages/th_feat_embroidery.asp

0

Punjab is a happening place in India. Various craft forms often synchronize with the popular folk music and produce an enchanting effect. People of Punjab are said to be very hard working and diligent at their vocation. Phulakri is predominantly a handiwork of the female folks of Punjab. The literal meaning of phulkari is flowering. This craft involves the embroidery of the flowering patterns on dupattas, shawls or other garments.

Evolution of the Craft

Phulkari is done with huge interest and enthusiasm by the women. They started doing phulkari in the backdrop of remaining free at home while their husbands were working away in the fields. It started off in the sixteenth century as amateurish disposition and evolved to a developed craft in 19th century.

How Phulkari is Done

Phulkari is done as making artistic small darn stitch over the cloth. These stitches are done in innumerable designs making the cloth immensely beautiful. When the stitches are made all over the body of the cloth, the prepared piece is called “Bagh”. The base cloth used for this purpose is home-spun, locally-woven and dyed khadi. The thread used is silk yarn also called Pat, that is imported from the various corners of Kashmir, Bengal, China and Afghanistan.

Colors and Designs:

The popular colors used in making phulkari are golden, yellow, crimson, orange, green, blue and pink. You may get to see plenty of designs in geometrical as well as natural patterns. Among figures, prominently of flowers, leaves, birds, animals and of human are popular. The figures of vegetables, pots, buildings, rivers, sun and moon are also displayed quite often. The baghs carrying dhoop-chhaon (sun-shade) patterns are very popular all over Punjab. Similarly, Dhaniya bagh (coriander), Motia Bagh (jasmine), Satranga Bagh (rainbow), Leheria Bagh (wavy) etc. are also very famous. Most sought after phulkaris are said to be Sainehi Phulkaris that carry the scenes of rural Punjab.

Significance of Phulkaris

Phulkari craft has played a significant role in defining the popular mood of Punjab. The phulkari designing and the scenes displayed on the clothes has been inspiration for various folk songs and other cultural activities. They show the feelings and emotions of the people. Phulkari done garments are exchanged in the familial ties essentially. It is said that bride when leaves for the house of groom, she is given many sets of Baghs to be worn in the in-law’s home. Phulkaris have some religious significance too. They are used as the canopy over the holy scripture of Sikhs, the Guru Granth Sahib.

For any kinds of informational and commercial leads, please visit Indian Phulkari Crafts.

Rajneesh Dubey
http://www.articlesbase.com/art-articles/phulkari-art-of-punjab-a-novel-indian-craft-236201.html

Incoming search terms:

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Filed under Free Embroidery Designs by on . Comment#

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Embroidery is proven to be one of the most enduring arts and crafts of all time. For centuries, this art form has long pervaded in many civilizations and has produced results that are truly worthy to own. Embroidery, whether traditional or contemporary, is in fact one of the most popular projects that found its way inside homes and has long been enjoyed by many individuals as a form of productive hobby. Embroidery is not cheap so to say. It requires equipments ranging from threads, needles and garments to sewing machines and digitizing software. However, if you really would like to make embroidery as your productive past time or perhaps a small business, you could actually cut back on its cost by simply having free embroidery designs.

One of the main advantages of using free embroidery designs can be credited to their cost-effectiveness. Unlike embroidery designs that are expensively sold in arts and crafts shops, free designs for embroidery projects, as their name suggests, can be acquired without imposing financial burden on your part. They also come in a wide variety of designs and styles, giving you more options to choose from. Hence, you could easily select the pattern or style that would ideally befit the embroidery project you intend to work on.

For more information on free embroidery digitizing click here

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Embroidery was first introduced as a hobby to decorate our ancestors' fabric materials with the use of needle and thread. Today, it is still used to decorate garments and household materials. Embroidery evolves the use of computerized machines to digitize the embroidery patterns. With embroidery machines, there are lots of ways to express your creativity as you work uniquely on your designs. And remember the opportunity to have free embroidery designs to download from Internet!

Embroidery machines can be used for personal and commercial purposes. Hobbyist' use them for sewing household linens, draperies, and decorative fabrics. They also use it to adorn bed linens, tablecloths, towels, and curtains. Commercially, it is used for product branding by putting logos and monograms on business shirts, jackets, gifts, and company apparels. It is also used for corporate advertising such as Christmas giveaways and anniversary souvenirs.

For more information on free hand embroidery designs click here

0

Embroidery was first introduced as a hobby to decorate our ancestors' fabric materials with the use of needle and thread. Today, it is still used to decorate garments and household materials. Embroidery evolves the use of computerized machines to digitize the embroidery patterns. With embroidery machines, there are lots of ways to express your creativity as you work uniquely on your designs. And remember the opportunity to have free embroidery designs to download from Internet!

Embroidery machines can be used for personal and commercial purposes. Hobbyist' use them for sewing household linens, draperies, and decorative fabrics. They also use it to adorn bed linens, tablecloths, towels, and curtains. Commercially, it is used for product branding by putting logos and monograms on business shirts, jackets, gifts, and company apparels. It is also used for corporate advertising such as Christmas giveaways and anniversary souvenirs.

For more information on free embroidery designs to download click here

0

Embroidery was first introduced as a hobby to decorate our ancestors' fabric materials with the use of needle and thread. Today, it is still used to decorate garments and household materials. Embroidery evolves the use of computerized machines to digitize the embroidery patterns. With embroidery machines, there are lots of ways to express your creativity as you work uniquely on your designs. And remember the opportunity to have free embroidery designs to download from Internet!

Embroidery machines can be used for personal and commercial purposes. Hobbyist' use them for sewing household linens, draperies, and decorative fabrics. They also use it to adorn bed linens, tablecloths, towels, and curtains. Commercially, it is used for product branding by putting logos and monograms on business shirts, jackets, gifts, and company apparels. It is also used for corporate advertising such as Christmas giveaways and anniversary souvenirs.

For more information on free hand embroidery designs click here