embroidery

1

Like what are the main types of stiches and what their names are and how you make it.

I have forgotten most of what I knew about tatting. However, I am capable of using Google, and so I can answer your question. Chain, picot, ring, double stitch.

I taught myself how to tat from an old needlecrafts book that my mother had. I also learned how to knit and crochet and do some embroidery from that book. You can still find such pamphlets and books in craft and hobby stores, as well as in libraries, if you prefer to read a book rather than look it up on the internet.

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3

Im at home and i cant go out, i want to do a craft with things at my house. Any suggestions?

I enjoy scrapbooking. I already have an album done to give as a Christams gift so all my friend will have to do is to put her photos on the pages and add the jourrnaling.

I also enjoy rubber stamping…making cards, small books, decorating things with stamped items.

Listed below is a great place to look for ideas, specific projects to do with tutorials.

Or you could try knitting, crocheting (good to do while watching tv), sewing, cross stitching, embroidery.

I also enjoy photography. So if you have a digital camera there's a lot you can take photos of. You could photograph the area you live in, plants andd flowers, events you attend, local events, whatever strikes your fancy. From there you could touch up your photos by editing them then create a slide show or DVD which has your photos set to music.

I like to read a lot. I'm always curious to learn more about a lot of different things, just for my own information. The library is available to all and is free to join. Or if you prefer you could look a lot of stuff up on the internet.

Exercise, many of us Americans (I assume you are American) are carrying too much weight and should move more. Even if you don't have any pounds to lose exercise makes you healthier.

Genealogy…tracing your family history and roots. A lot of the research can be done on the internet these days. It's one of those things that's on my list to get around to.

There are a lot of craft ideas out there for the holidays. Your local library might be a good place to look for ideas of things you can make to decorate for Thanksgiving and Christmas. There are also a lot of home made gift ideas out there this time of the year, Look both at books and at what magazines the library gets. The current issue is not usually available for check out but you can use the copier at the library or take you digital camera and take detailed photos of the project. Also have scrap paper with you to trace any patterns that you'll need or again you could photo copy them.

Gardening Watch DVD's, VHS movies

Stamp (postage) or coin collecting,

Learn to draw, or learn basket weaving.

Learn a new skill that's been on your list.

Hope this list is a help and a starting point for you.

Filed under Embroidery Library by on . 3 Comments#

2

I've been knitting nice big squares to make a blanket. The yarn I'm using is all different shades of bright green and I wanted to use purple to connect them. I don't want to hide the purple color and thought a blanket stitch would work perfectly. Can I use a blanket stitch to connect pieces? How do you do it? Any help would be great!

No a blanket stitch is for going aroundappliquee or around the edge of the blanket, not for connecting two squares. Check out your library for embroidery and knitting books for examples ofstitchess that would work

Filed under Embroidery Library by on . 2 Comments#

7

I am looking for a small sewing machine that I can use to do repairs (hems and such) and sew small items like cat toys. I don't want anything really fancy or expensive, but I DO want it to work well! Does anyone have any recommendations?

Ask your local sewing machine dealers about what they've got in used machines.

http://www.cet.com/~pennys/faq/smfaq.htm

What I want for beginners in sewing:

– a machine that doesn't scare you
– a machine that isn't balky (cheap new machines are often very
balky or need adjustments often and are rarely repairable —
just too frustrating to learn on!)
– very good straight stitch
– good zigzag (4-5 mm is fine, more than that is gravy)
– a method of making buttonholes that makes sense to you
– adjustable presser foot pressure (which helps some fabric
handling issues)
– accessory presser feet that don't cost an arm and a leg
(machines that use a "short shank foot" typically handle
generic presser feet pretty well. Some brands of machines use
proprietary or very expensive presser feet)

If the budget stretches far enough:

– blindhem and stretch blindhem stitches
– triple zigzag (nice for elastic applications)
– a couple of decorative stitches (you won't use them nearly as
much as you think)
– electronic machine because of the needle position control and
because the stepper motors give you full "punching force" at
slow sewing speeds — mechanical machines often will stall at
slow speeds.

Please go to the best sewing machine dealers around and ask them
to show you some machines in your price range, *especially* used
machines you can afford. You'll get a far better machine buying
used than new, and a good dealer is worth their weight in sewing
machine needles when you get a machine problem — often they can
talk you through the problem over the phone. While you're trying
things out, try a couple of machines (sewing only, not combo
sewing-embroidery) over your price limit, just so you can see
what the difference in stitch quality and ease of use might be.
You may find you want to go for the used Cadillac. Or you might
want the new basic Chevy. Might as well try both out.

Suggested reading: John Giordano's The Sewing Machine Book
(especially for used machines), Carol Ahles' Fine Machine Sewing
(especially the first and last few chapters) and Gale Grigg
Hazen's Owner's Guide to Sewing Machines, Sergers and Knitting
Machines. All of these are likely to be available at your public
library.

Used brands I'd particularly look for: Elna, Bernina,
Viking/Husqvarna, Pfaff, Singer (pre 1970), Juki, Toyota

New "bargain brand" I'd probably pick: Janome (who also does
Kenmore).

Filed under Embroidery Library by on . 7 Comments#

2

In the price range of $300 or less, what is the best sewing machine to buy? Brand name and model specific please. It would be used to create designed stitches, and would like to make button holes but not a must have.

"create designed stitches" is not a phrase I really understand…. are you trying to say that it needs to do embroidery? Or are you saying you need programmable stitch functions? Or are you telling me it will be used for a variety of garments? If you can clarify for me, I'd be happy to try further. Otherwise, here's my advice for first sewing machines:

http://www.cet.com/~pennys/faq/smfaq.htm

What I want for beginners in sewing:

– a machine that doesn't scare you
– a machine that isn't balky (cheap new machines are often very
balky or need adjustments often and are rarely repairable —
just too frustrating to learn on!)
– very good straight stitch
– good zigzag (4-5 mm is fine, more than that is gravy)
– a method of making buttonholes that makes sense to you
– adjustable presser foot pressure (which helps some fabric
handling issues)
– accessory presser feet that don't cost an arm and a leg
(machines that use a "short shank foot" typically handle
generic presser feet pretty well. Some brands of machines use
proprietary or very expensive presser feet)

If the budget stretches far enough:

– blindhem and stretch blindhem stitches
– triple zigzag (nice for elastic applications)
– a couple of decorative stitches (you won't use them nearly as
much as you think)
– electronic machine because of the needle position control and
because the stepper motors give you full "punching force" at
slow sewing speeds — mechanical machines often will stall at
slow speeds.

Please go to the best sewing machine dealers around and ask them
to show you some machines in your price range, *especially* used
machines you can afford. You'll get a far better machine buying
used than new, and a good dealer is worth their weight in sewing
machine needles when you get a machine problem — often they can
talk you through the problem over the phone. While you're trying
things out, try a couple of machines (sewing only, not combo
sewing-embroidery) over your price limit, just so you can see
what the difference in stitch quality and ease of use might be.
You may find you want to go for the used Cadillac. Or you might
want the new basic Chevy. Might as well try both out.

Suggested reading: John Giordano's The Sewing Machine Book
(especially for used machines), Carol Ahles' Fine Machine Sewing
(especially the first and last few chapters) and Gale Grigg
Hazen's Owner's Guide to Sewing Machines, Sergers and Knitting
Machines. All of these are likely to be available at your public
library.

Used brands I'd particularly look for: Elna, Bernina,
Viking/Husqvarna, Pfaff, Singer (pre 1970), Juki, Toyota

New "bargain brand" I'd probably pick: Janome (who also does
Kenmore).

Filed under Embroidery Library by on . 2 Comments#

4

I always feel like i have a "book" in me, but when I try to sit down and write my mind goes blank! I cant help thinking everything I write is utter crap.

Also I want to be better at needlework and stuff like that but I'm so clumsy! How do I just get better at creative/artistic stuff?

I've always believed that 'inspiration' is the key to most creativity in life. As a professional artist, I am still constantly in search of that tiny spark which, I know, will ignite my passion and energies.

You need to relax and not force yourself to create that story or piece of needlework because you may believe something inside of you says it 'has to happen' right there and then.

Which sort of writers inspire you? Would you see yourself as a future J.K. Rowling or a modern day Jane Austen? Read up on the great works of literature or, better still, browse through some of the short stories in magazines and papers; most of these have been submitted by people just like you. They can be the springboard for bigger things ahead.

Don't assume everything you write is rubbish. Even if an editor rejects it, that still doesn't mean it's no good. You really need to persist … rather like a terrier with a rag. Believe me, I ought to know!

Contemporary embroidery is also an art not to be sneezed at. Have a look at the V&A museum or, if you can't get there, go to the library and read up on their history of great art and crafts. I am sure you can find art & craft fairs locally to give you inspiration (plus a few handy tips!) especially as the festive season approaches.

If you think you 'have it in you' then, frankly, you obviously have. Sit down, take a deep breath, and tell yourself you can do it!

Good luck!

Filed under Embroidery Library by on . 4 Comments#

3

I want to start making my own clothes but I don't want to buy a lousy sewing machine.

A used one. Here's my standard advice for beginners:

Start with reading the following faq — my comments expand on it:
http://www.cet.com/~pennys/faq/smfaq.htm

—-
What I want for beginners in sewing:

– a machine that doesn't scare you
– a machine that isn't balky (cheap new machines are often very
balky or need adjustments often and are rarely repairable —
just too frustrating to learn on!)
– very good straight stitch
– good zigzag (4-5 mm is fine, more than that is gravy)
– a method of making buttonholes that makes sense to you
– adjustable presser foot pressure (which helps some fabric
handling issues)
– accessory presser feet that don't cost an arm and a leg
(machines that use a "short shank foot" typically handle
generic presser feet pretty well. Some brands of machines use
proprietary or very expensive presser feet)

If the budget stretches far enough:

– blindhem and stretch blindhem stitches
– triple zigzag (nice for elastic applications)
– a couple of decorative stitches (you won't use them nearly as
much as you think)
– electronic machine because of the needle position control and
because the stepper motors give you full "punching force" at
slow sewing speeds — mechanical machines often will stall at
slow speeds.

Please go to the best sewing machine dealers around and ask them
to show you some machines in your price range, *especially* used
machines you can afford. You'll get a far better machine buying
used than new, and a good dealer is worth their weight in sewing
machine needles when you get a machine problem — often they can
talk you through the problem over the phone. While you're trying
things out, try a couple of machines (sewing only, not combo
sewing-embroidery) over your price limit, just so you can see
what the difference in stitch quality and ease of use might be.
You may find you want to go for the used Cadillac. Or you might
want the new basic Chevy. Might as well try both out.

Suggested reading: John Giordano's The Sewing Machine Book
(especially for used machines), Carol Ahles' Fine Machine Sewing
(especially the first and last few chapters) and Gale Grigg
Hazen's Owner's Guide to Sewing Machines, Sergers and Knitting
Machines. All of these are likely to be available at your public
library.

Used brands I'd particularly look for: Elna, Bernina,
Viking/Husqvarna, Pfaff, Singer (pre 1970), Juki, Toyota

New "bargain brand" I'd probably pick: Janome (who also does
Kenmore).

Filed under Embroidery Library by on . 3 Comments#

4

Haven't sewed anything since junior high and totally have no recollection of anything including threading a bobbin. HELP!!! I want to start off with a machine that is easy to use and cheap. Just in case I mess it up it's not a lot of expense out of my pocket.

http://www.cet.com/~pennys/faq/smfaq.htm

What I want for beginners in sewing:

– a machine that doesn't scare you
– a machine that isn't balky (cheap new machines are often very
balky or need adjustments often and are rarely repairable —
just too frustrating to learn on!)
– very good straight stitch
– good zigzag (4-5 mm is fine, more than that is gravy)
– a method of making buttonholes that makes sense to you
– adjustable presser foot pressure (which helps some fabric
handling issues)
– accessory presser feet that don't cost an arm and a leg
(machines that use a "short shank foot" typically handle
generic presser feet pretty well. Some brands of machines use
proprietary or very expensive presser feet)

If the budget stretches far enough:

– blindhem and stretch blindhem stitches
– triple zigzag (nice for elastic applications)
– a couple of decorative stitches (you won't use them nearly as
much as you think)
– electronic machine because of the needle position control and
because the stepper motors give you full "punching force" at
slow sewing speeds — mechanical machines often will stall at
slow speeds.

Please go to the best sewing machine dealers around and ask them
to show you some machines in your price range, *especially* used
machines you can afford. You'll get a far better machine buying
used than new, and a good dealer is worth their weight in sewing
machine needles when you get a machine problem — often they can
talk you through the problem over the phone. While you're trying
things out, try a couple of machines (sewing only, not combo
sewing-embroidery) over your price limit, just so you can see
what the difference in stitch quality and ease of use might be.
You may find you want to go for the used Cadillac. Or you might
want the new basic Chevy. Might as well try both out.

Suggested reading: John Giordano's The Sewing Machine Book
(especially for used machines), Carol Ahles' Fine Machine Sewing
(especially the first and last few chapters) and Gale Grigg
Hazen's Owner's Guide to Sewing Machines, Sergers and Knitting
Machines. All of these are likely to be available at your public
library.

Used brands I'd particularly look for: Elna, Bernina,
Viking/Husqvarna, Pfaff, Singer (pre 1970), Juki, Toyota

New "bargain brand" I'd probably pick, if new was my choice:
Janome (who also does Kenmore).

Filed under Embroidery Library by on . 4 Comments#

1

I have a beautiful framed picture hand embroidered lovingly by a relation now passed on of the coronation 60 years ago . It is in storage and seems such a waste. There must be someone who would love it on their wall.

This could be very valuable as Queen Elizabeth is celebrating her Diamond Jubilee this year. I would have it appraised by a reputable antique dealer. One that specializes in British history. Start getting appraisals at different dealers until you come across one who knows the worth. You could put it on Ebay or Craig's list just to see what the highest bid is, but not sell. If you wish to donate, it should be in a historical place, a library or some such setting as it is very valuable I would think. If you don't want to check out appraisals, before I would donate it, I would save it and pass it down thru the family to someone who would appreciate the value and the time it took for your relation to make it.

Filed under Embroidery Library by on . 1 Comment#

8

I'm just looking for the simple templates to print from right off the computer for my son and granddaughter, I've seen some copies in my docs. office and thought I would copy some off to keep around the house for the kids. I'd also like to get some that go along with the upcoming holidays!! Thanks! :):)

I came across a great site the other day while searching for embroidery and applique patterns. I showed my kids and they loved it. The site has a lot of Disney movie characters and scenes. There's lots to choose from. Most are for free and there is another optional section for tonnes more that you can download.Hope you and the kids like it.Here's the link:
http://www.colouringbookpages.co.uk/index.php