2

0 How To Create Monogramshttp://www.HowToCreateMonograms.com is a video program DVD teaching you how to create beautiful large & small monograms using your standard fonts in your embroidery software. I am using the Tajima by Pulse software.

Duration : 0:9:49

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0

0 Baba Sang Public Library Vocational Training52% of women in India are illiterate, our institution is trying to change this by developing new literacy and vocational programs. Baba Sang Public Library village Dhesian Sang District Jalandhar was opened in April 2006. A computer center was added in 2007, some seminars on Drugs, Jobs, Social Evils and Farming were held, now we have embarked upon Vocational training for village girls. These courses provide young people from village backgrounds with Computer,Stitching, Beautician and Cooking courses. These skills which can be used to develop a career, this can lead to securing a job.

Duration : 0:5:9

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1

0 The DIY Dish & Anna Maria Hornerhttp://www.theDIYdish.com – Join Kim and Kris as they interview designer, Anna Maria Horner. She has a beautiful new fabric line, Loulouthi, new patterns, and big news about her work with Janome. Interview took place at the International Quilt Market 2011. Anna also shares a free hand embroidery pattern.

Duration : 0:8:49

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0

0 James Burke : Connections, Episode 4, Faith In NumbersWatch Entire Series: http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=PLmo9vOINxhRkiZioqITzxqPNU7WWJPLYz&playnext=1

Episode 4 of James Burke's most well-known series "Connections" which explores the surprising and unexpected ways that our modern technological world came into existence. Each episode investigates the background of usually one particular modern invention and how it came into being. These explorations are an attempt to locate the "connections" between various historical figures who seemingly had nothing to do with each other in their own times, however once connected, these same figures combined to produce some of the most profound impacts on our modern day world; in a "1+1=3" type of way.

It is this type of investigation that is the main idea behind the Knowledge Web project; whereby sophisticated software is used to attempt to discover these subtle interconnections automatically. See http://k-web.org.

See channel page for purchase options.

Duration : 0:48:44

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3

0 Embroidery in the hoop Table RunnerSee the latest in-the-hoop embroidery project by PJ Designs.

Made for the 5-by-7 inch hoop, this project includes 12 delicate embroidery patterns. Checks, swirls, waves, flowers, and other motifs are brought to life on a fabric canvas and framed by a beautiful scalloped edge. Each square in the overall pattern is given depth and dimension by a thick inner batting, with fabric flanking both sides to make the runner reversible and enjoyable from front to back.
The step-by-step instructions easily guide you in creating first the squares, then the columns, which can then be repeated to make the runner just the right length. And with detailed pictures and directions to guide your hands, your mind and heart are free to create all the color, warmth and texture you want to bring to your table—and effectively showcase your symbol of hearth and home!

Duration : 0:1:18

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4

Hello,
I decided I would really like to learn how to sew but right now i have no idea how to. I was just wondering how you started (sewing clothes for dolls, reading books,etc) and any advice on how I should as well.
Thanks!

Although it's certainly possible to learn to sew all on your own, just from books and experimentation, it's easier for almost everyone if you take a few classes along the way — either informally from family and friends, or formally from teachers.

Assuming it's machine sewing you're interested in, I usually start beginners with projects like pillowcases or drawstring bags, tote bags, tool or jewelry rolls, pj pants or nightgowns. My own first hand sewing experiences were in embroidery, then hemming dishtowels; my first machine sewing was cafe curtains, when I was not quite 6.

Your first challenges will include skills like cutting accurately (easier said than done!), learning to control the sewing machine, stitching straight and curved seams accurately, pressing seams correctly and learning to select fabric and pattern that can work together.

If you're thinking about buying a sewing machine, and you happen to have classes available that will let you use someone else's sewing machines, I'd suggest you go that route for first experience; then you can better judge machines when you go looking. http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20100120140429AApYwiY

Where to find lessons: 4H, if you're young enough; fabric stores and sewing machine dealers; adult ed and community college classes, private lessons. If you're in the US and stuck, try contacting the local chapter of ASG, American Sewing Guild (http://www.asg.org) to see if someone can suggest a teacher. Good books to start with include Simplicity's Simply The Best Sewing Book (which has a home-dec leaning), Connie Crawford's Guide to Fashion Sewing (strictly garments), and the good ol' Readers Digest Complete Guide to Sewing. There are also videos and DVDs available; one I particularly like for a beginner is Crawford's Studio Sewing Skills, which starts with learning to thread a sewing machine and progresses through basic clothing construction, step by step. Check with your local library and grab some books or videos and start playing with some fabric!

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2

I do not want to have to pack up a machine and send it away. What about waranties?

Look for a local shop that sells machines and provides service. Buy a decent machine — the cheapest new machines are usually impossible to repair or too expensive to repair, and are often fairly user-hostile. If your budget is limited, I strongly suggest buying a good used machine.

Generally, with machines that are available only through dealerships, the actual warranty work is done by the dealer.

Also, generally, purely mechanical machines (not electronic or computerized, but the ones that use cams and gears and a conventional electric motor) can be serviced by virtually any sewing machine shop. Things start getting tricky when you get into the fancier machines, and you'll just have to ask shops if they can fix a whatever…

http://www.cet.com/~pennys/faq/smfaq.htm

What I want for beginners in sewing:

– a machine that doesn't scare you
– a machine that isn't balky (cheap new machines are often very
balky or need adjustments often and are rarely repairable —
just too frustrating to learn on!)
– very good straight stitch
– good zigzag (4-5 mm is fine, more than that is gravy)
– a method of making buttonholes that makes sense to you
– adjustable presser foot pressure (which helps some fabric
handling issues)
– accessory presser feet that don't cost an arm and a leg
(machines that use a "short shank foot" typically handle
generic presser feet pretty well. Some brands of machines use
proprietary or very expensive presser feet)

If the budget stretches far enough:

– blindhem and stretch blindhem stitches
– triple zigzag (nice for elastic applications)
– a couple of decorative stitches (you won't use them nearly as
much as you think)
– electronic machine because of the needle position control and
because the stepper motors give you full "punching force" at
slow sewing speeds — mechanical machines often will stall at
slow speeds.

Please go to the best sewing machine dealers around and ask them
to show you some machines in your price range, *especially* used
machines you can afford. You'll get a far better machine buying
used than new, and a good dealer is worth their weight in sewing
machine needles when you get a machine problem — often they can
talk you through the problem over the phone. While you're trying
things out, try a couple of machines (sewing only, not combo
sewing-embroidery) over your price limit, just so you can see
what the difference in stitch quality and ease of use might be.
You may find you want to go for the used Cadillac. Or you might
want the new basic Chevy. Might as well try both out.

Suggested reading: John Giordano's The Sewing Machine Book
(especially for used machines), Carol Ahles' Fine Machine Sewing
(especially the first and last few chapters) and Gale Grigg
Hazen's Owner's Guide to Sewing Machines, Sergers and Knitting
Machines. All of these are likely to be available at your public
library.

Used brands I'd particularly look for: Elna, Bernina,
Viking/Husqvarna, Pfaff, Singer (pre 1970), Juki, Toyota

New "bargain brand" I'd probably pick, if new was my choice:
Janome (who also does Kenmore).

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1


Cottage industry can't complete an embroidery project without a design and even can't start one without it. So free embroidery designs are like a backbone for surviving cottage industry where embroiderer can do their profession efficiently without any delay. They can collect thousand of unique design from the free embroidery designs sites.

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1


Cottage industry can't complete an embroidery project without a design and even can't start one without it. So free embroidery designs are like a backbone for surviving cottage industry where embroiderer can do their profession efficiently without any delay. They can collect thousand of unique design from the free embroidery designs sites.

Filed under Free Embroidery Designs by on . 1 Comment#

2

I want to start making my own clothes (I have someone to teach me how) and I can buy a Singer 2638 in excellent condition for $75. Is that a good model to start with? And is $75 a good price?

Singer is not the company it once was.

http://www.cet.com/~pennys/faq/smfaq.htm

What I want for beginners in sewing:

– a machine that doesn't scare you
– a machine that isn't balky (cheap new machines are often very
balky or need adjustments often and are rarely repairable —
just too frustrating to learn on!)
– very good straight stitch
– good zigzag (4-5 mm is fine, more than that is gravy)
– a method of making buttonholes that makes sense to you
– adjustable presser foot pressure (which helps some fabric
handling issues)
– accessory presser feet that don't cost an arm and a leg
(machines that use a "short shank foot" typically handle
generic presser feet pretty well. Some brands of machines use
proprietary or very expensive presser feet)

If the budget stretches far enough:

– blindhem and stretch blindhem stitches
– triple zigzag (nice for elastic applications)
– a couple of decorative stitches (you won't use them nearly as
much as you think)
– electronic machine because of the needle position control and
because the stepper motors give you full "punching force" at
slow sewing speeds — mechanical machines often will stall at
slow speeds.

Please go to the best sewing machine dealers around and ask them
to show you some machines in your price range, *especially* used
machines you can afford. You'll get a far better machine buying
used than new, and a good dealer is worth their weight in sewing
machine needles when you get a machine problem — often they can
talk you through the problem over the phone. While you're trying
things out, try a couple of machines (sewing only, not combo
sewing-embroidery) over your price limit, just so you can see
what the difference in stitch quality and ease of use might be.
You may find you want to go for the used Cadillac. Or you might
want the new basic Chevy. Might as well try both out.

Suggested reading: John Giordano's The Sewing Machine Book
(especially for used machines), Carol Ahles' Fine Machine Sewing
(especially the first and last few chapters) and Gale Grigg
Hazen's Owner's Guide to Sewing Machines, Sergers and Knitting
Machines. All of these are likely to be available at your public
library.

Used brands I'd particularly look for: Elna, Bernina,
Viking/Husqvarna, Pfaff, Singer (pre 1970), Juki, Toyota

New "bargain brand" I'd probably pick: Janome (who also does
Kenmore).

Filed under Embroidery Library by on . 2 Comments#